Overlays

Overlays act as "layers" of definitions (custom commands, aliases, environment variables) that can be activated and deactivated on demand. They resemble virtual environments found in some languages, such as Python.

Note: To understand overlays, make sure to check Modules first as overlays build on top of modules.

Basics

First, Nushell comes with one default overlay called zero. You can inspect which overlays are active with the overlay list command. You should see the default overlay listed there.

To create a new overlay, you first need a module:

> module spam {
    export def foo [] {
        "foo"
    }

    export alias bar = "bar"

    export env BAZ {
        "baz"
    }
}

We'll use this module throughout the chapter: Whenever you see overlay add spam, assume spam is referring to this module.

To create the overlay, call overlay add:

> overlay add spam

> foo
foo

> bar
bar

> $env.BAZ
baz

> overlay list
───┬──────
 0 │ zero
 1 │ spam
───┴──────

In the following sections, the > prompt will be preceded by the name of the last active overlay. (spam)> some-command means the spam overlay is the last active overlay when the command was typed.

Removing an Overlay

If you don't need the overlay definitions anymore, call overlay remove:

(spam)> overlay remove spam

(zero)> foo
Error: Can't run executable...

(zero)> overlay list
───┬──────
 0 │ zero
───┴──────

The overlays are also scoped. Any added overlays are removed at the end of the scope:

(zero)> do { overlay add spam; foo }
foo

(zero)> overlay list
───┬──────
 0 │ zero
───┴──────

Furthermore, overlay remove without an argument will remove the last active overlay.

Overlays are Recordable

Any new definition (command, alias, environment variable) is recorded into the last active overlay:

(zero)> overlay add spam

(spam)> def eggs [] { "eggs" }

Now, the eggs command belongs to the spam overlay. If we remove the overlay, we can't call it anymore:

(spam)> overlay remove spam

(zero)> eggs
Error: Can't run executable...

But we can bring it back!

(zero)> overlay add spam

(spam)> eggs
eggs

Overlays remember what you add to them and store that information even if you remove them. This can let you repeatedly swap between different contexts.

TIP

Sometimes, after adding an overlay, you might not want custom definitions to be added into it. The solution can be to create a new empty overlay that would be used just for recording the custom changes:

(zero)> overlay add spam

(spam)> module scratchpad { }

(spam)> overlay add scratchpad

(scratchpad)> def eggs [] { "eggs" }

The eggs command is added into scratchpad while keeping spam intact.

Coming in version 0.64: To make it less verbose, you can use the overlay new command:

(zero)> overlay add spam

(spam)> overlay new scratchpad

(scratchpad)> def eggs [] { "eggs" }

Preserving Definitions

Sometimes, you might want to remove an overlay, but keep all the custom definitions you added without having to redefine them in the next active overlay:

(zero)> overlay add spam

(spam)> def eggs [] { "eggs" }

(spam)> overlay remove --keep spam

(zero)> eggs
eggs

The --keep flag does exactly that.

Ordering Overlays

The overlays are arranged as a stack. If multiple overlays contain the same definition, say foo, the one from the last active one would take a precedence. To bring some overlay to the top of the stack, you can call overlay add again:

(zero)> def foo [] { "foo-in-zero" }

(zero)> overlay add spam

(spam)> foo
foo

(spam)> overlay add zero

(zero)> foo
foo-in-zero

(zero)> overlay list
───┬──────
 0 │ spam
 1 │ zero
───┴──────

Now, the zero overlay takes a precedence.